Seborrheic Eczema – What It Is? And How to Treat It!

Seborrheic Eczema – What It Is? And How to Treat It!

Seborrheic Eczema – What It Is? And How to Treat It!

 

Introduction

Eczema can be displayed in varying ways and forms but one specific form of Seborrheic Dermatitis is one that can be difficult to deal with and treat on a daily basis. The following article goes into depth about what eczema is on a basis and what seborrheic dermatitis is and how to treat it.

What Is Eczema? 

Eczema is a skin condition where the skin becomes inflamed, itchy, red, cracked, and very rough. This term is usually used to generally describe common skin conditions such as atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, dyshidrotic eczema, and nummular eczema. Although there are several types of eczema, the most common type is atopic dermatitis. Along with the previously listed effects, the skin of those who suffer from eczema may start to blister if not treated properly. Some things that can cause such reactions is the consumption of certain foods like tomatoes, nuts, and dairy. The specific effects of eating such foods vary depending on the age of the candidate. Although this may be the case, most reactions result in red and itchy bumps that are very hard to resist scratching. Along with the consumption of certain foods, various environmental aspects, such as smoke and pollen, can cause the irritation of eczema. Despite the redness and itchy qualities eczema has, it is not contagious.

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Seborrheic Dermatitis

Seborrheic Dermatitis is a very common skin condition that affects the scalp. It can potentially cause scaly patches, red skin, and very stubborn dandruff in the scalp. Treatment isn’t always necessary for this eczema type and can potentially go away on its own. With the same potential seborrheic dermatitis has of going away, it also has the ability to come back. It is recommended to use a gentle shampoo that works specifically for those who have this form of eczema. Symptoms of Seborrheic Dermatitis include the following: 

  1. Skin flakes on the scalp, hair, eyebrows, beard or mustache 
  2. Patches of greasy skin covered with flaky white or yellow scales
  3. Red skin 
  4. Itching  

This form of eczema is typically caused by a specific type of fungus called Malassezia which is a component of the oil secretion on the skin as well as an irregular response of the immune system. This condition most commonly develops in those who have neurologic and psychiatric conditions, a weakened immune system, and or have recently recovered from a stressful medical condition. For people this applies to, it is best to consult with your doctor regarding the best treatment options for you in particular.

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Medicinal Treatments  

The best way to tackle seborrheic eczema treatment wise is to use products that are specifically made to target and treat inflammation. The easiest products to use that do so are creams, shampoos, and or ointments. The following list of medications is also known to target inflammation are prescription-strength Hydrocortisone, Fluocinolone, Clobetasol, and Desonide. The aforementioned medications are all corticosteroids in which should be applied to the scalp or other affected areas. They are very easy to use but should be applied in small quantities. Although these medications do have great perks, there are some negative aspects. When using corticosteroids for long extended periods of time with no breaks, side effects like thinning skin and or skin streaks or lines become visible. In some cases, corticosteroids will be paired up with antifungal gels/pills or creams to better combat this form of dermatitis. Please keep in mind that it is always good to check with a doctor before using or taking any medicines to manage your seborrheic dermatitis.

Seborrheic Eczema

Home Remedies, Treatments and Tips 

  1. Gently clean your eyelids 
  2. Gently wash your baby’s scalp
  3. Wear smooth-textured cotton clothing  
  4. Avoid skin and hair products that contain alcohol 
  5. Wash your Skin Regularly 
    1. Be sure to rinse the soap completely off of your scalp and body 
    2. Avoid harsh soaps and use an efficient moisturizer 
  6. Medicated Creams
    1. It’s best to try a mild corticosteroid cream and affected areas 
    2. Do NOT get it in your eyes  
  7. Styling Products Must Go! 
    1. Do NOT use hairsprays, gels and other styling products when monitoring and addressing this form of eczema 
  8. Shampoo Facial Hair Regularly 
    1. It is key that those who have facial hair keep the skin underneath them clean 
  9. Soften and Remove Scales from Hair 
    1. Use mineral oil or olive oil to the scalp 
    2. Leave in for and hour or more 
    3. Comb or brush your hair 
    4. Wash 

Do you want more helpful eczema tips and tricks? Get Your FREE Eczema Handbook NOW! CLICK HERE: To Stop Itching & Start Living TODAY!

Seborrheic Eczema

Conclusion 

It is always good to have a basis of understanding regarding this form of eczema or any other form for that matter. Although dealing with seborrheic dermatitis might be a little bit frustrating at first, one must find the right course of treatment that best suits them, and afterwards, life with this form of eczema becomes much better!

6 Types Of Eczema – And Why You Need To Know The Difference!

6 Types Of Eczema – And Why You Need To Know The Difference!

6 Types Of Eczema – And Why You Need To Know The Difference!

 

Types Of Eczema

 

Introduction 

        Eczema. It can be displayed in varying ways and forms. With this being said, do you know all about them? Better yet, do you know what all of them are or if you may be experiencing symptoms? The following article goes into depth about the different types of eczema, their symptoms, prevention tactics, as well as their treatments.

Types of Eczema - OurEczemaStory.com

1. Atopic Dermatitis

          Atopic Dermatitis most commonly develops in earlier stages of childhood and is most commonly passed down genetically. Symptoms typically consist of the following: 

  1. Dry skin 
  2. Itching 
  3. Red or brownish-gray patches on the skin 
  4. Small, raised bumps 
  5. Thickened, cracked, or scaly skin 
  6. Raw sensitive swollen skin due to scratching 

 

These symptoms are caused because of the skin’s inability to provide protection the skin is naturally supposed to. This includes retaining moisture and protecting the skin from bacteria, irritants and allergens. Although this may seem like something that cannot be controlled, there are in fact ways to try and prevent and or maintain the skin if you or your child has atopic dermatitis. These prevention tactics include the following: 

 

  1. Moisturizing the skin at least twice a day 
  2. Identifying and avoiding triggers 
  3. Taking short(er) baths and or showers 
  4. Taking bleach baths 
  5. Using gentle soaps 
  6. Drying yourself carefully 

Types of Eczema

Taking these measures cannot promise life without atopic dermatitis but it can ensure a more bearable lifestyle if you or your child has it as well as attempt to prevent it. Although there are several things to do in attempts to prevent and maintain atopic dermatitis, if symptoms are left untaken care of for too long, complications including asthma and hay fever, chronic itchy, scaly skin, skin infections, irritant hand dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, and sleep problems may occur. It is very important to monitor yourself and or your child very closely if they have this condition.

2. Contact Dermatitis

           Contact Dermatitis is a skin rash caused by contact with a specific substance. This said substance can cause irritation to the skin or cause an allergic reaction. Symptoms typically consist of a red rash, itching, dry, cracked, and scaly skin, bumps, blisters, and swelling, burning and or tenderness to the skin. These symptoms are caused by substances the skin is exposed to that cause irritation triggering an allergic reaction. If the reaction is very severe, it can potentially cause irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. The most common irritants include solvents, rubbing alcohol, bleach and detergents,shampoos, permanent wave solutions, airborne substances, such as sawdustor wool dust plants, and fertilizers and pesticides. Just like there are common irritants, there are common allergens which include the following: 

 

  1. Nickel 
  2. Medications 
  3. Balsam 
  4. Formaldehyde 
  5. Personal care products 
  6. Plants 
  7. Airborne substances 
  8. Products that cause a reaction when you’re in the sun

Types of Eczema - By: OurEczemaStory.com

Although this may seem like something that cannot be controlled, there are in fact ways to try and prevent and or maintain the skin if you or your child has contact dermatitis. These prevention tactics include the following:

  1. Avoiding irritants and allergens 
  2. Washing your skin 
  3. Wearing protective clothing or gloves 
  4. Applying an iron-on patch to cover metal fasteners next to your skin 
  5. Applying a barrier cream or gel 
  6. Using moisturizer 
  7. Taking care of skin around pets

Types of Eczema - By: OurEczemaStory.com

Although there are several things to do in attempts to prevent and maintain contact dermatitis, complications such as infections can arise if one lets it go untreated for too long. Such complications are more prone to be seen in people who have the following occupations: 

 

  1. Healthcare and dental employees
  2. Metalworkers 
  3. Construction workers 
  4. Hairdressers and cosmetologists 
  5. Auto mechanics 
  6. Scuba divers/swimmers (the rubber in the face masks or goggles) 
  7. Cleaners 
  8. Gardeners and agriculture workers 
  9. Cooks or those who work with food in general 

 

If you have Contact Dermatitis and you have any of the aforementioned jobs, you must ensure that you take the necessary steps to protect yourself as best as you can to avoid any infections and discomfort.

3. Dyshidrotic Eczema

       Dyshidrotic Eczema is a common form of eczema which causes small itchy blisters on the edges of various body parts like the fingers, toes, palms, and soles of the feet. Symptoms typically include deep blisters on the edges of fingers, toes, palms and the soles of the feet, itching, redness, flaking, scaly and or cracked skin, and pain. Dyshidrotic Eczema normally appears in adults at the age of 20 up to age 40. Although this may be the case, it is possible for children to have as well. Like any form of eczema, there are common triggers for dyshidrotic eczema. Some of these triggers include the following: 

  1. Stress 
  2. Pollen 
  3. Moist hands and feet 
  4. Nickel  found in jewelry and foods
    1. Cocoa 
    2. Chocolate 
    3. Soy beans 
    4. Oatmeal 
    5. Nuts 
    6. Almonds 
    7. Fresh and dried legumes 
    8. Canned food 
  5. Cobalt in everyday objects and foods 
    1. Clams 
    2. Fish 
    3. Leafy green vegetables 
    4. Liver 
    5. Milk 
    6. Nuts  
    7. Oysters 
    8. Red meat 
  6. Chromium 

Types of Eczema - By: OurEczemaStory.com

Despite the fact that it may appear as though living life with dyshidrotic eczema may seem quite hard, there are certain things that can be done to make having and living with it a lot more comfortable. Some prevention and manageability tactics that once can practice consist of the following: 

 

  1. Washing the affected area of skin with a mild cleanser 
  2. Removing rings and other jewelry when washing hands 
  3. Moisturize after washing or immersing your hands and or feet 
  4. Moisturizing frequently during the day when skin starts to feel dry 
  5. Washing your hands and or feet immediately after touching a potential trigger 
  6. Learning ways to manage stress 
  7. Avoid quick changes if possible to control 
  8. Keep nails cut short 

Types of Eczema - By: OurEczemaStory.com

Taking these measures cannot promise a life without dyshidrotic eczema, but these are some measures that can be taken to make having this form of eczema more manageable on a day to day basis.

4. Nummular Eczema

Nummular Eczema can be seen in any age group. This is the one form of eczema that can appear differently than other forms which leaves it to be difficult to treat. Symptoms typically consist of the following: 

 

  1. Coin-shaped lesions on arms, legs, hands/torso 
  2. Itching and burning 
  3. Lesions that are oozing liquid or have crusted over 
  4. Red, pinkish or brown, scaly and inflamed skin around the lesions 

Although this form of eczema is difficult to treat, similar triggers have been observed in several people who have this form of eczema. Some of these similar triggers include the following: 

 

  1. Damage to the skin resulting from: 
    1. Insect bites 
    2. Scrapes 
    3. Scratches  
    4. Chemical burns  
  2. Reaction to inflammation 
  3. Dry skin especially during the winter 
  4. Metals like nickel 
  5. Topical medications 
    1. Topical antibiotic creams 
    2. Isotretinoin and interferon

Types of Eczema - By: OurEczemaStory.com

This form of eczema is difficult to treat but creams are the most common form of treatment. Typically one is given a prescription for a steroid medication to decrease the level of inflammation. Mild and moderately-potent steroids aren’t normally prescribed because they don’t work as well as the stronger steroid creams. These stronger steroid creams are used because under the correct and proper treatment using this medication, it usually goes away completely. Steroids are not always necessary for this particular type of eczema. Some doctors may prescribe phototherapy, coal tar creams and or non-corticosteroid medications depending on the severity of the Nummular Eczema. It is key for someone with this type of eczema to be extra careful about how they treat this condition and to always consult their doctor before applying any form of medication.

Do you want more helpful eczema tips and tricks? Get Your FREE Eczema Handbook NOW! CLICK HERE: To Stop Itching & Start Living TODAY!

5. Seborrheic Dermatitis

Seborrheic Dermatitis is a very common skin condition that affects the scalp. It can potentially cause scaly patches, red skin and very stubborn dandruff in the scalp. Treatment isn’t always necessary for this eczema type and can potentially go away on its own. With the same potential seborrheic dermatitis has of going away, it also has the ability to come back. It is recommended to use a gentle shampoo that works specifically for those who have this form of eczema.

Symptoms of Seborrheic Dermatitis include the following: 

  1. Skin flakes on the scalp, hair, eyebrows, beard or mustache 
  2. Patches of greasy skin covered with flaky white or yellow scales
  3. Red skin 
  4. Itching  

Types of Eczema - By: OurEczemaStory.com

Seborrheic Dermatitis

Seborrheic Dermatitis is a form of eczema is typically caused by a specific type of fungus called Malassezia which is a component of the oil secretion on the skin as well as an irregular response of the immune system. This condition most commonly develops in those who have neurologic and psychiatric conditions, a weakened immune system, and or have recently recovered from a stressful medical condition. For people this applies to, it is best to consult with your doctor regarding the best treatment options for you in particular.

6. Stasis Dermatitis 

Stasis Dermatitis causes inflammation, ulcers, and itchy skin on the lower legs. It generally develops in people who have conditions that result in poor blood flow to the legs. Some of these conditions include the following: 

 

  1. DVT 
  2. Varicose veins  
  3. Enlarged and swollen veins 
  4. Injury to the lower leg 
  5. Any surgery that affects the veins in the lower leg 
  6. Congestive heart failure 

Types of Eczema - OurEczemaStory

Symptoms of Stasis Dermatitis

Symptoms of Stasis Dermatitis vary but the most common symptoms are those of any other form of eczema; irritated skin and red, itchy or swollen skin. If this condition progresses however, symptoms can become worse. These symptoms include swelling (which spreads to the calves), red/purple ulcers, shiny/swollen skin, and itchy/dry and cracked skin. With any condition, risks are always involved. In regards to Stasis Dermatitis, these factors include: 

 

  1. Being over 50 years old 
  2. Being overweight/obese 
  3. Having any condition that affects blood circulation 
  4. Having kidney disease 
  5. Giving birth 
  6. Standing or sitting for extended periods of time 
  7. Getting insufficient exercise

Types of Eczema - OurEczemaStory

Treating Stasis Dermatitis

Treating this condition consists of relieving the symptoms listed above. Depending on the doctor as well as the severity of this eczema, treatment protocol may be different. The most standard forms of treatment consists of: 

 

  1. Wearing compression stockings to provide circulation and relieve swelling 
  2. Sleeping with legs elevated 
  3. Elevating the legs for 15 minutes every two hours 
  4. Taking medications to decrease the level of pain  
  5. Using antihistamines to stop itching 
  6. Antibiotics 
  7. Using emollients as a moisturizer to protect the skin 

In some cases, one can suffer complications while having Stasis Dermatitis even while taking necessary measures to get better. Complications consist of chronic leg ulcers, leg wounds that fail to heal, abscesses, cellulitis, and infected bone. To decrease the likelihood of getting this condition, one can exercise and maintain a healthy weight, ensure that they get enough exercise, and limit sodium consumption.

Conclusion

Eczema, in all its forms, can be managed and maintained in many different ways. But, knowing more about each of them can allow you to take better care of yourself and your loved ones if you see small symptoms early on. Knowing what you’re looking at can be very beneficial for you, in the long run, relieving you of severe pain later on down the road if it progresses that far.

Do you want more helpful eczema tips and tricks? Get Your FREE Eczema Handbook NOW! CLICK HERE: To Stop Itching & Start Living TODAY!

Does My Baby Have Cradle Cap or Eczema?

Does My Baby Have Cradle Cap or Eczema?

We recently received an email from a mother who was worried about her baby having cradle cap and eczema. It turns out her baby was suffering from cradle cap and not eczema.

It’s a natural reaction to think your baby may have eczema when you see dried flakes of skin in their hair. But this could simply be cradle cap and not eczema.

Lets have a look at the differences and how to treat cradle cap.

What is cradle cap?

Cradle cap affects young babies and forms as red/brown crusty scales on their head. It starts on the head but can progress and spread to their face and diaper area. If this occurs it may be diagnosed by your Doctor or Gp as seborrheic dermatitis. Seborrheic dermatitis is a noninfectious skin condition that’s very common in infants and babies. It usually starts in the first few weeks of their lives and slowly disappearing over a period of weeks or months.

Cradle cap is very common and should cause you no concerns at all. Cradle cap can start at birth and usually disappears before your childs first birthday. Many mothers worry about their child’s cradle cap and look for any way to treat and cure it. However, medical treatment is not called for.

Cradle cap and eczema can look very similar but the conditions are totally different. In this article, we will look at both symptoms and help you identify the differences. If you are unsure and worried about your child’s condition our advice would always be to seek medical advice from your Doctor or GP.

Our advice is given from experience, not medial training and should be taken as such. We have been treating and managing eczema in my family for over 200 Years starting back with my great grandmother and through to myself and my 3 children. One of my sons has very bad eczema and has received just about every form of eczema treatment known to man. So our advice on cradle cap and eczema has been gained from these experiences and shared to help others.

What’s the difference between cradle cap and eczema?

It’s easy to confuse cradle cap and eczema so don’t beat yourself up if you are worried or concerns, that’s natural as a new mum or dad.  It’s always best to seek advice rather than risk leaving it and unconsciously making your child suffer for longer.

The symptoms of cradle cap and eczema may look similar but on close inspection, it’s easy to spot the differences. There are also historical facts that can help determine whether your child has cradle cap or eczema. For instance if eczema runs in your family the chances of your baby having it are increased.

Family history can have a big part to play in the diagnosis of eczema. It’s very rare to not have any form of eczema in your family then suddenly you give birth to a child that has the condition. We are not saying this is impossible, but there is usually a sign of eczema already in your family which is passed down from generation to generation.

Cradle cap is a build-up of natural oils and dry scaly skin. This forms a yellow & brown crust on your babies head, eyebrows or behind the ears. It is totally natural and easy to treat, treatment is not always needed and some parent choice to simply and naturally leave it to disappear naturally through washing and bathing.

Eczema is patches of red, dry and itchy skin on the face or behind the ears, and in the creases of the neck, knees, and elbows. The main issues with eczema in babies is the irresistible urge to scratch the itchy patches and the eczema can get infected as a result. This is the number one issue with eczema, therefore, most treatments involve trying to reduce the inflammation to reduce itching. Essential oils for babies are a good way to treat infant eczema we have included a link to our full review of this treatment for you. The number one rule for treating eczema is to moisturize and avoid irritants and foods that can cause flare-ups.

How do you treat cradle cap?

The good news for cradle cap is that the condition isn’t contagious, and it generally isn’t painful or itchy. Plus, it won’t leave any scars. Most people simply worry due to the appearance and the worry that it may be eczema and not cradle cap.

Treatment is simple and a natural approach is best.

Cradle cap comes from the production of too much oil (sebum) in the oil glands and hair follicles, trapping dead skin cells. Another reason may be Malassezia, which is a yeast fungus that grows in the sebum along with bacteria. The best way to prevent cradle cap is to wash your babies hair daily with a gentle and mild babies shampoo like CeraVe Baby Shampoo this will help prevent the build-up of oils and stop the scalp from becoming dry and scaly.

How to manage cradle cap:

  • Apply baby oil or olive oil to your babies head before bedtime
  • Wash off the oil using a mild and gentle shampoo
  • Dry with a soft towel
  • Brush the excess skin flakes off with a cradle cap brush

This process is the best way to treat and manage cradle cap. Don’t worry if in this process some hair falls out. It will grow back and is totally natural and will not leave any bald patches.

Brushing the excess skin from their head is very therapeutic for both mother and child. My wife loved to sit for hours taking all the bits of dead skin out from our sons head. It’s a good way to build that natural mother and child bond.

Sometimes the cradle cap can start to weep fluid and spread to your child’s face and neck area, again this isn’t anything to worry about but if you’re unsure then please seek medical advice to check that no bacteria has crept into the cracked skin. Again if it has, don’t worry this is easily treated.

Is cradle cap itchy?

Cradle cap if left untreated can become itchy if the dry scales build up which will make your child’s scalp inflamed and red/sore.

Baby eczema is very itchy and this is one of the main signs and differences between the two. Eczema is more red and sore and itchy and cradle cap is drier, flaky and not as itchy.

Cradle cap can become itchy if the skin is left and trapped in the hair. This is why most people brush the loose flakes out of their child’s hair.

What is infant eczema?

Infant eczema is red patches of dry and itchy skin. They are normally rough to touch and can become inflamed and raised.

Babies can suffer from infant eczema all over their body but it mainly affects their knees, joints, armpits and other sweaty areas of the body.

Eczema happens when the body makes too few fatty cells called ceramides. If you don’t have enough of them, your skin will lose water and become very dry. The treatment is to replace lost moisture daily.

Baby eczema is often confused with Atopic Dermatitis which is totally different. Baby and infant eczema often disappear without warning after a year or two. Treatment should be to moisturize their skin daily and remove any irritants like the ones listed below to help reduce the itchiness.

  • Wool and other hot materials, keep your child’s skin cool
  • Stress and tiredness
  • Soaps that change the skin’s natural pH
  • Some laundry detergents and washing powders. Try Bio Balls chemical-free washing
  • Cleaning solutions, including dish soap, disinfectants, or surface cleaners
  • Sprays and air fresheners
  • Perfumes
  • Chemicals like chlorine, mineral oil, or solvents
  • Dust or sand
  • Cigarette smoke
  • Damp and mold

If you are worried about your child having any form or eczema then please visit our website where we have hundreds of helpful eczema articles written by us and other parents coping with this skin condition.

Cradle cap treatment

Keep it natural. Wash your babies head with a good quality baby shampoo that is sensitive and gentle. Our top 3 picks are listed below and we have included a link for these products from Amazon to make it easier for you to find. These are in no particular order of preference.

Follow the steps explained above and you will have no problem treating cradle cap.

  1. TruBaby Eczema Soothing Hair and Body Wash
  2. CeraVe Baby Shampoo
  3. Organic baby shampoo with Cucumber & Aloe Vera

Final thoughts on cradle cap and eczema

The first thing to remember if your baby has cradle cap is not to panic! It is very common and easy to treat. Most parents you talk to will tell you their child had cradle cap of some shape or form. I don’t personally know any baby that didn’t have some form of cradle cap, even if it was just for a week or so.

Keep the treatment simple, apply oils overnight and wash off the next morning. Then dry and enjoy brushing out the dead skin and bond with your baby.

We hope you found this article helpful, please share if you do and help other parents manage their child cradle cap.

Resources

  1. https://atopicdermatitis.net/eczema-irritants-causes/
  2. https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/eczema/ss/slideshow-top-eczema-triggers
  3. https://www.healthline.com/health/parenting/how-to-get-rid-of-cradle-cap
  4. https://www.mothercare.com/advice-buying-guides-and-services/advice/babys-here/caring-for-your-baby/cradle-cap/advice-ms-baby-health-sub2.html
  5. https://www.pampers.co.uk/newborn-baby/care/article/what-is-cradle-cap-and-how-to-soothe-your-baby